A Carpenter’s Journal

November 6, 2012

Bathroom Remodel in an Antique Cape

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This job was in an old cape in Duxbury built in 1808.  It was post and beam framed.  The beams and posts were some kind of hardwood which I could not identify, very hard and reddish in color,  with marks of the adze visible.  In another old cape we remodeled here I found a King George III coin which I gave to the owners.  While pulling the ceiling down here, along with squirrels nests, blown in insulation, wood lath, horsehair plaster and 200 years of dirt swept through the cracks of the floor boards. There was one artifact, a piece of an old slingshot.  It had a very old type of cord woven from hemp.

The waste pipe from the upstairs bathroom had been leaking and the main beam it passed by and the outside sill adjacent to it were wet and mouldy but still structurally sound.  There were some other beams that were rotten but the rot looked old and not due to this leak.  The beam in the middle of the house and its intersecting beam had sagged considerably over the years relative to the perimeter built on stone.  The result was that the floor was out of level by about 2 inches in 7 feet.  I ended up rebuilding the floor by adding joists 16 oc between the beams and placing floor jacks on blocks under the sags and partially lifting the sag out of the beams.  I also used the new joists and subfloor to cheat the new floor much closer to level.

 

 

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